Cord : Supercharged Beverly 1937 Cord Supercharged 812 Beverly

December 24th, 2010

Cord : Supercharged Beverly 1937 Cord Supercharged 812 Beverly photo

Click here to see the auction. Currently $34500.00.

Rust free – Damage Free – Possibly the Lowest Mileage Unrestored Cord Automobile in Existence! If you are a Cord enthusiast or ever considered purchasing one of these magnificent cars I would recommend that you read this listing in its entirety. These automobiles in the last few years have gotten away price-wise from most collectors and this could be one of the last remaining unrestored cars available. Offers / Trades prior to auction end will be considered. I will answer all questions in a timely manner. This automobile is subject to prior sale as it is also for sale locally. A virtually rust-free 1937 Cord Supercharged Beverly. This car is believed to have 2,692 original miles on it from new. It has been in Western USA high desert storage for the last 55 years and will be the ultimate restoration for any Cord enthusiast. Part of the fascinating history of this particular car is that it does not appear in the Cord Master List as it has been out of circulation in private hands for over a half of a century. All of the correct supercharged (also referred to as simply SC) sheetmetal is present although the car is currently configured with an outside pipe non-supercharged driveline. In addition to the complete non-SC engine, the correct supercharged block that matches the VIN will be included in this auction. **1 of 184 produced ** One of One Hundred Eighty-Four Supercharged Beverly’s built by the Factory The official DMV Title dated 1953 as well as the Central Body tag both confirm the cars authentic Supercharged status. The dashboard instruments are still in place including the correct 150 MPH speedometer showing 2,692 miles. The new owner will have the option of restoring the car with the non-SC engine or acquiring the needed components at some point in the future bringing it back as the full Supercharged version. This Beverly has been prepared for the first phase of restoration and is in high quality black satin primer over an acid etched bare metal base. The only filler on the automobile is some of the factory finished lead that remained after stripping, and a very small amount of polyester glaze that was used over areas that were metal finished to cover very fine tool marks left in the process akin to small nicks from the hammer and dolly. These metal finished areas can be seen in the pictures that show the car in bare metal. They were areas where there were door dings or small dents no larger than the size of an American quarter coin. At this point in its preparation, no work has been done to block out and fill the factory lead other than to fastidiously clean and prepare the metal surface for that next level of show quality paint preparation. There are no covered over holes or perforations in the body whatsoever. This virtually rust free, damage free original condition is pretty much unheard of for a car of nearly 75 years old especially a Cord. There are no reproduction panels anywhere on this body. The factory original driver and passenger area floors as well as the trunk floor area are perfect. The floors areas have been cleaned, acid etched and painted in the factory red-lead color matched modern formulation primer. The rear wheelhouses, a site of normal rust-thru even in California cars, are perfect. We have carefully cleaned and painted them without disturbing the factory undercoating which is normally lost even in the most expensive of restorations. All four doors were undamaged and near perfect after stripping to bare metal with the exception of three small pinhole-sized perforated areas at the bottoms which have been cleaned, acid etched and professionally metal finished by an artisan with over 25 years experience on Ferrari’s and Lamborghini’s. Door, hood and trunk gaps are very good and confirm once again the damage free history. I have spent a good deal of time describing the fact that the car is so incredibly damage and rust free simply because that is hardly ever the case with these cars. Auburn, Cord and Duesenberg (ACD) automobiles are by far are some of the most collectable automobiles in the world and are supported by the great work of the Auburn Cord Duesenberg Museum and the Members of the Auburn Cord Duesenberg Club. I find it fascinating that the Cord cars specifically were often referred to as highly collectible, rare, important, treasured, classics, etc. even only after a few years of their original production. The Cord 810 and 812 were prized belongings of many famous people who could have afforded any car they wished including Amelia Ehrhart, Tom Mix, Betty Davis, Sonja Henie, Armenian Royalty of Միչիգան , etc. Cords have enjoyed the accolade of full classic status with the Antique Automobile Club of America or AACA only months after their original production ceased in 1937. With prices of these classics now far surpassing the $100,000 mark for a sedan, only a car of this quality has a chance of measuring up to those heights when completed. The best advice that I ever received in this hobby was to acquire the most important car that you can afford, in the best possible condition, and then grow with it. This 1937 SC Cord Beverly is just that car. Remember while considering this Cord for your collection that you cannot ever hope to have a appreciating asset if you start out with the wrong marque or the wrong car. Unfortunately history has proven time and time again that if you undertake a restoration starting with a rusted out specimen of dubious provenance that you will most likely end up with a very expensive restoration of a rusted out example with the same dubious provenance…. Mechanically; many of the hard to find parts to restore this automobile are included in this sale. Cord generator, starter, Startex, master cylinder, distributor and cap, coil, waterpump, Stromberg EE-15 carb, outside door handles including an excellent locking passenger version, battery box cover, emergency brake assembly, Dash instruments; including the 150 MPH speedometer, and more. In addition, the original and correct closed car radio, control head and rebuildable speaker are included. A rare accessory in good condition that is included is the cord wing emblem which mounts to the very nose of the hood. Correct trunk and hood hinges, latches, props are included as well as the licence plate bronze angle base and diecast light. The engine has not been run recently but appears to be in excellent condition as does the transmission and front wheel drive components. After some level of inspection it appears that the included non-supercharged engine has been rebuilt and is very clean and fairly well detailed. The car has the correct sheetmetal for the supercharged outside pipe configuration. As you may know, this outside pipe option was available only on supercharged 1937 cars from the factory. However, many cars, both 1936 and 1937, were returned directly to Cord or a selling dealer to add the pipe feature as a result of their immense popularity. In order to have and use this SC configuration on any Cord you must also have the very rare set of cast iron exhaust manifolds which direct the exhaust to the outside of the hood versus down under the car as done in the non-supercharged versions. An excellent set of these manifolds are included in the sale ready to be re-porcelainized by Prairie or another qualified shop. The steering and steering box, front drive components and suspension appear to be complete and in good condition. I have included several pictures of the engine inspection for your review. I would leave the final assessment to your own independent inspection which I always encourage. One particular area of interest when it comes to condition can be found at the firewall. Almost as a rule, all Cord automobiles have had large holes cut or even hacked into their firewall’s to repair the engines timing chain assembly. These “windows” were cut in to avoid disassembling the entire front end and entirely removing the engine to service this part. One piece of proof that would suggest that the stated mileage is correct is that this Beverly’s firewall has never been cut or altered in any way. After all, why would a 2,600 mile car need it? Couple that with it’s being in the same garage with the same owner for more than 55 years and judging from it’s damage free, rust free condition you might very be looking at the lowest mileage Cord automobile in existence. Of course this is another area I would ask for you to rely on your own inspection as cars this old are sold as mileage unknown. The front windshield and all door glass is new unmarked safety PPG laminate with the back windshields being both excellent originals. All interior window garnish moldings are present as are the front windshield glass tilt out frames. The interior includes an good driver and passenger seats ready for restoration and re upholstery. Door panels are pretty much there for patterns only but are also available through several sources who specialize in such items. There are many, many talented trustworthy folks who belong to the ACD Club who deal in parts for these fine automobiles as well as offer professional rebuilding services for many of the car’s mechanical components. At the appropriate time, I would be pleased to make those introductions. I recommend that the very first thing you do if you are the successful bidder is join this great organization as well as the Museum. The annual ACD Reunion held each year in Auburn, Indiana is quite incredible. As an added bonus, I will include a one-year paid membership to the club if you are not already a member. Additionally, I will include a new copy in the publisher’s wrapper of the original and definitive book on this marque titled Cord 810/812 The Timeless Classic written by noted author Josh B. Malks. You cannot successfully restore a Cord of any kind without this piece of incredible research. The book is also available new on Amazon.com from Hickman Books for $250.00. Please ask all of your questions prior to bidding. While this is an incredible unrestored car find that will be worth every moment spent on her, it is nevertheless a seventy-five year old car being sold as-is, where-is without any express or implied warranty whatsoever. The car will be transferred to the new buyer with a clear title without any liens and or encumbrances whatsoever. In closing, I have been a car enthusiast and private collector for over 35 years. I originally purchased this car to reconfigure and restore it as a non-SC car and to utilize some of the extra parts acquired at the same time for another Cord project I am working towards completion on. These extremely rare sedans are also great family cars and are the personal choice of some of the most knowledgeable Cord experts and enthusiasts including Mr. Malks himself. Unfortunately, with just too many commitments on my current automobile project list, including several Cords; I have decided to let someone else bring this car to it’s well deserved completion. I will be pleased to go over any of the details of the car with you and will help any prospective buyer with their arrangements for shipping this car anywhere in the world. Thank you again for reviewing this wonderful project. A brief history of Cord; In the brief history of the 810/812 Cords two names stand out–Errett Lobban Cord and Gordon Buehrig. E.L. Cord was first and foremost a salesman, both of products and of himself. In 1924, after achieving great success as an automobile distributor, Cord sold the board of the Auburn Automobile Company on the idea that he was just the man to revive their slumbering enterprise. He delivered on his promises. By 1929 Auburn sales had increased fifteen-fold and E.L. was the head of an empire. His Cord Corporation owned Lycoming Mfg. Co. (engines), Limousine Body Co. and Central Mfg. Co. (auto bodies), Century Airlines, and Duesenberg, among others. Cord’s philosophy of automobile design (and salesmanship) might be summed up in two words: Novelty Sells. His Auburn’s were mechanically ordinary, but outstanding styling and clever paint combinations made them hot sellers. In 1929 he oversaw the introduction of the fabulous Model J Duesenberg, a car whose combination of size, cost, performance, and style was and is unmatched in American automotive history. The same year also saw E. L.’s most novel car yet, the Cord L-29. It was the first American production car to feature front-wheel drive. This allowed the car to be much lower than other cars of the era. That, coupled with a very long hood, made the L-29 one of the most rakish, visually striking cars on the market. But 1929 saw the stockmarket crash and the beginning of the Great Depression. The market for cars like the L-29 came to an end. Production was phased out in 1932. Gordon Buehrig crossed paths with E.L. Cord in the summer of 1929 when Buehrig was hired as chief stylist at Duesenberg. Only 25 years old at the time, he had accumulated design and coachbuilding experience at a variety of body and auto companies, including Harley Earl’s newly-created Art & Colour Section at General Motors. Between 1929 and 1933 Buehrig created many of the striking body designs for which Duesenberg became famous. In 1933, with the Depression taking its toll on super luxury cars like Duesenberg, Buehrig returned to General Motors. Here he participated in one of the design competitions Harley Earl periodically held to stimulate the creativity of his stylists. Far different from the standard look of the time, Buehrig’s design had a coffin-shaped nose and horizontal hood louvers that contrasted sharply with the upright grilles that were then typical. The hood, coupled with flowing pontoon fenders and hidden headlights, put the car on the cutting edge of the streamlined look. Buehrig’s fellow stylists thought his design the winner, but Earl and the other GM executives placed Buehrig’s radical car last. Later in 1933 Duesenberg president Harold Ames invited Buehrig back to style a “baby Duesenberg” intended to fill the price gap between the awesomely expensive Model J Duesenberg and the middle-priced Auburn. Buehrig’s GM design contest entry became the basis of the “baby Duesenberg” design. The running prototype of the new Duesenberg was finished by April of 1934. But in July, the parameters changed. The new car would not be a Duesenberg but a Cord. In keeping with the legacy of the L-29 it would be front wheel drive and powered by a newly designed V8 engine from Lycoming. Working furiously, Buehrig’s small team completed the design by December. The next six months would demonstrate just how close to disaster the Cord Corporation actually was. Lack of money caused the new car to be shelved again, but by July of 1935 the sale of kitchen cabinets made by one of Cord Corporation’s divisions provided just enough cash flow to revive the project. The bad news was that E.L. Cord wanted the car introduced at the New York Auto Show on November 2, 1935. Buehrig himself later summed up the consequences of this decision: “This left three months and 26 days to pick up the Cord program where it had been stopped the first of January and to build and test a prototype, complete tooling and have production cars ready for the show. It was an impossible task, and although it was accomplished (after a fashion) it was not done well and the results were so financially crippling that it eventually put the company out of business.” (Special Interest Autos April 1989) The cars that went to the auto show were hand-built but not drivable because the tooling for the new four-speed transmissions was not ready. Nevertheless, the stunning styling was the hit of the show, and Cord salesmen took numerous orders. Alas, the factory was not ready to fill them. New Cords did not come off the line until February 15, 1936, and even these had numerous bugs. Transmissions unexpectedly popped out of gear; engines overheated; front universal joints were excessively noisy. Eventually these problems were worked out, but the damage had been done. The fabulous Cord never made a profit, and production ended in August 1937. Auburn itself filed for bankruptcy in December, and it was all over. In the end the everything conspired against the success of the Cord. The long delay between introduction and production, the early mechanical problems, the precarious financial state of Auburn itself all made potential buyers leery. The Cord’s price further reduced the pool of potential customers. A good $500 more than Cadillac’s most popular series, and it was in the vicinity of Packard’s Super 8. But even that market was shrinking. Buehrig’s Cord could not save E.L.’s empire, but automotive enthusiasts would come to regard it as one of the great classics of all time. Taken from an online history provided by THEHENRYFORD.COM

Cord : Supercharged Beverly 1937 Cord Supercharged 812 Beverly photo
Cord : Supercharged Beverly 1937 Cord Supercharged 812 Beverly photo

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